Hugh Gaylard and (Alice --?)

Hugh Gaylard was the son of Nicholas Gaylard and Johanna Sevenocke. While his father didn't mention any of his children in his will, his mother mentions "Hugh my son, whom executor" and his stepfather Giles Alvyn left money to a Hugh Gaylard. However, he is mentioned in his stepfather Giles Alvyn's will. Hugh held two messuages and two ferlings of bondland and two acres of overland in Lakemeade in South Trendle, a hamlet in Pitminster, Somerset, England, "formerly of Nicholas Gaylerde" and was "first fined for 1 acre of bondland called Sothergrove in the same tithing, by grant of Johanna Gaylarde, his mother, to attract the rest of her lands," in 1572.

He is also seen purchasing lands in Blagdon, Somerset 30 September 1580, South Trendle 6 October 1584 and 22 March 1604/5, and Duddleston, Somerset 26 September 1587, 17 September 1591, 6 September 1593, and 29 May 1596. He surrendered land in South Trendle to the use of his son George 10 April 1609.

Hugh's wife may have been the Alice -- buried 17 February 1628/9 in Pitminster, Somerset, England. Note that, if Alice is Hugh's wife, she was buried only six days after her daughter-in-law Margery.

Hugh was buried 21 October 1614
in Pitminster, Somerset, England. Lea and Hutchinson noted, "His will, deposited in the Archdeaconry of Taunton, has unfortunately perished."

Hugh’s children, perhaps by Alice, are:

  1. Catherine Gaylard, christened 26 Sep 1576 in Pitminster, Somerset, England.
  2. Elizabeth Gaylard, christened 30 Apr 1581 in Pitminster, Somerset, England, married Tobias Barrett (minister) 13 May 1617 in Pitminster, Somerset, England.
  3. George Gaylard, christened 20 Sep 1583 in Pitminster, Somerset, England, married 1) Margery -- (bur. 11 Feb 1628/9 in Pitminster, Somerset, England) and 2) Elizabeth -- (named by George as executor of his will), a yeoman, will dated 9 Sep 1665 and proved 1 Jun 1667.
  4. Edmund Gaylard, married Joan Crosse (bur. 12 Jul 1649 in Pitminster, Somerset, England) 16 May 1615 in Pitminster, Somerset, England, a yeoman, buried 10 Dec 1661 in Pitminster, Somerset, England, will dated 14 Nov 1661 and proved 18 Apr 1663.
  5. Richard Gaylard, christened 11 Apr 1591 in Pitminster, Somerset, England, married 1) Mary Pococke (bur. 12 Mar 1616/7 in Pitminster, Somerset, England) 22 Apr 1616 in Pitminster, Somerset, England and 2) Martha Bennett (bur. 10 Oct 1648 in Pitminster, Somerset, England) 24 Sep 1617 in Pitminster, Somerset, England, buried 26 Mar 1656 in Pitminster, Somerset, England.
  6. Alice Gaylard, christened 10 May 1594 in Pitminster, Somerset, England, married Richard Treat (bp. 28 Aug 1584 in Pitminster, Somerset, England, one of two men appointed for Wethersfield 29 Sep 1642 to approve if calves were to be killed, among those appointed 1 Dec 1642 to find out how much several towns would disburse towards the building of a ship and if feasible, oversee the building of it, served on the jury of the Particular Court several times 1643-48, townsman 17 Feb 1653/4, 24 Feb 1654/5, and 1660, appointed to collect the tax due for Wethersfield Dec 1645, among those chosen to determine the seating in the meetinghouse 28 Dec 1649, part of a committee to lay out lands granted by the town in 1654, part of a committee on 16 Apr 1658 to treat with John Russell (the minister) to see if he would leave or tarry, appointed to a committee to procure a minister for the town 24 March 1658/9, 1663, 1664 and 1667), appointed to a committee to secure a house for the minister Feb 1660/1, deputy to the General Court at numerous sessions 1644-1657/8, one of two men chosen for Wethersfield 25 Oct 1644 to demand what each family would give to maintain scholars at Cambridge and gather these funds, assistant 1658-65, chosen to examine Thirty Mile Island for settlement 4 Oct 1660, one of the patentees of the Royal Charter of Connecticut granted by Charles II in 1662, member of Governor Winthrop's Council 17 Dec 1663 and 1 Jul 1664, died in 1669/70, will dated 13 Feb 1668/70 in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut and proved 3 Mar 1669/70) 27 Apr 1615 in Pitminster, Somerset, England, arrived in New England between 1637 and 1639, probably settled first in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, living in Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut by 1641.


Sources: 

  1. Somerset Heritage Service; Taunton, Somerset, England; Somerset Parish Records, 1538-1914; Reference Numbers: D\P\PIT/2/1/1 and D\P\PITC/2/1/1. Ancestry.com. Somerset, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1531-1812 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016. Original data: Anglican Parish Registers. Somerset Archives & Local Studies, South West Heritage Trust, Taunton, England.
  2. Ancestry.com. Hartford, Connecticut Probate Records, 1639-1700 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. Original data: A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, Hartford District, 1635-1700. Vol. I. n.p., 1906.
  3. Probate Files Collection, Early to 1880; Author: Connecticut State Library (Hartford, Connecticut); Probate Place: Hartford, Connecticut. Ancestry.com. Connecticut, Wills and Probate Records, 1609-1999 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Original data: Connecticut County, District and Probate Courts.
  4. Lea, J. Henry and Hutchinson, J. R., "Clues from English Archives Contributary to American Genealogy," The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 41, Jul 1910, pgs. 183-191 (pgs. 183-190 inclusive).
  5. Treat, John Harvey, The Treat Family: A Genealogy of Trott, Tratt, and Treat for Fifteen Generations, and Four Hundred and Fifty Years in England and America, Salem, MA: The Salem Press Publishing & Printing Company, 1893.
  6. Starr, Frank Farnsworth, Various Ancestral Lines of James Goodwin and Lucy (Morgan) Goodwin of Hartford, Connecticut, Vol. II (Morgan Lines), Hartford, CT: The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Press, 1915, pgs. 223-261.
  7. Torrey, Clarence A., New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004.
  8. Stiles, Henry R., Families of Ancient Wethersfield Connecticut, Part 1, 1904, (reprinted by Heritage Books, Westminster, MD, 2006).

 

Records related to the Hugh and Alice Gaylard family but not copied below due to copyright considerations:

  1. Spear, Burton W., Search for the Passengers of the Mary & John, 1630, Vol. 27, New Ancestral Discoveries, Part 3, Toledo, OH: The Mary & John Clearing House, 1999, pgs. 63-82 73-75.
  2. Gaylord, Benjamin H., "The English Ancestry of Deacon William Gaylord: New Light and Observations," The American Genealogist, 1982, vol. 58, pgs. 218-223.




Church Records

Name:    Kathrene Gaylard
Event Type:    Baptism
Baptism Date:    26 Sep 1576
Baptism Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Christening record of Kathrene Gaylard

Name:    Elizabeth Guylard
Gender:    Female
Event Type:    Baptism
Baptism Date:    30 Apr 1581
Baptism Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Burial record of Elizabeth Gaylard

Name:    Georg Guylard
Event Type:    Baptism
Baptism Date:    20 Sep 1583
Baptism Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England
Father:    Hugh Guylard

Christening record of Georg Gaylard

Name:    Richard Guylard
Event Type:    Baptism
Baptism Date:    11 Apr 1591
Baptism Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England
Father:    Hugh Guylard

Christening record of Richard Gaylard

Name:    Alce Gaylard
Gender:    Female
Event Type:    Baptism
Baptism Date:    10 May 1594
Baptism Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England
Father:    Hugh Guylard

Christening record of Alice Gaylard

Name:    Richard Trott
Event Type:    Baptism
Baptism Date:    28 Aug 1584
Baptism Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England
Father:    Robert Trott

Christening record of Richard Trott

Name:    Alice Gaylard
Gender:    Female
Event Type:    Marriage
Marriage Date:    27 Apr 1615
Marriage Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England
Spouse:    Richard Trett

Marriage record of Richard Trett and Alice Gaylard

Name:    Edmond Saylard
[Transcription error; should read Edmond Gaylard]
Gender:    Male
Event Type:    Marriage
Marriage Date:    16 May 1615
Marriage Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England
Spouse:    Joan Crose

Marriage record of Edmond Gaylard and Joan Crosse

Name:    Richard Gaylard
Gender:    Male
Event Type:    Marriage
Marriage Date:    22 Apr 1616
Marriage Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England
Spouse:    Mary Pococke

Marriage record of Richard Gaylard and Mary Pococke

Name:    Marie Gaylard
Event Type:    Burial
Burial Date:    12 Mar 1616
[The original record shows that this burial took place in 1616/7.]
Burial Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Burial record of Marie Gaylard

Name:    Elizabeth Gaylard
Gender:    Female
Event Type:    Marriage
Marriage Date:    13 May 1617
Marriage Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England
Spouse:    Talias Barnett
[Transcription error; should read Tobias Barrett]

Marriage record of Tobias Berrett and Elizabeth Gaylard

Name:    Richard Gaylard
Gender:    Male
Event Type:    Marriage
Marriage Date:    24 Sep 1617
Marriage Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England
Spouse:    Martha Bennett

Marriage record of Richard Gaylard and Martha Bennett

Name:    Hugh Gaylard
Event Type:    Burial
Burial Date:    21 Oct 1614
Burial Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Burial record of Hugh Gaylard

Name:    Margery Grllard
[Transcription error; should read Margery Gellard]
Event Type:    Burial
Burial Date:    11 Feb
[The year was left off in the index but in the original record, it shows that this burial took place in 1628/9.]
Burial Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Burial record of Margery Gellard

Name:    Alice Grllard [Transcription error; should read Alice Gellard]
Event Type:    Burial
Burial Date:    17 Feb
[The year was left off in the index but in the original record, it shows that this burial took place in 1628/9.]
Burial Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Burial record of Alice Gellard

Name:    Martha Gailard
Event Type:    Burial
Burial Date:    10 Oct 1648
Burial Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Burial record of Martha Gailard

Name:    Joan Gailard
Event Type:    Burial
Burial Date:    12 Jul 1649
Burial Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Burial record of Joan Gailard

Name:    Richard Gaylard
Event Type:    Burial
Burial Date:    26 Mar 1656
Burial Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Burial record of Richard Gaylard

Name:    Edmund Gaylard
Event Type:    Burial
Burial Date:    10 Dec 1661
Burial Place:    Pitminster, Somerset, England

Burial record of Edmund Gaylard

Source: Somerset Heritage Service; Taunton, Somerset, England; Somerset Parish Records, 1538-1914; Reference Number: D\P\PITC/2/1/1. Ancestry.com. Somerset, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1531-1812 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016. Original data: Anglican Parish Registers. Somerset Archives & Local Studies, South West Heritage Trust, Taunton, England.


The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record

CLUES FROM ENGLISH ARCHIVES
Contributory to American Genealogy.
By J. Henry Lea and J. R. Hutchinson.
(Continued from Vol. XLI, p. 82, of The Record.)
The 19th day of April, 1634, I Joan Patten of Crewkerne, co. Somerset, being weake of bodie, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following: I give to every one of my brothers twenty shillings apiece; to my sister Sarah my best gown, and to every of her children twelve pence; to my sister Elizabeth twenty marks; to William Gaylard in New England five pounds to be bestowed for him as my executor shall think fit; to Richard Pore forty shillings; to Giles Browne twenty shillings; to Henrie Brooke twenty shillings; to the widow Arundell five shillings; and all the rest of my goods I give to my sister, whom I do make sole executrix of this my will. Memo that if it be so devised and expressed by my father's last will that my portion given (by) my father shall after my decease be equally divided between my sisters Marie and Elizabeth, then the twenty marks before given to my sister Elizabeth shall cease and not be paid. Memo also that Marie the sister of Joan Patten was nominated by the said Joan for her executrix. Witnesses: John Bull, Elizabeth Patten, widow. No Probate.
(Cons. Wells, Book 47, f. 11.)

The above most interesting will serves to give us a clue to an important family of Pitminster, in the County of Somerset, of which the founders (so far as at present known) were Nicholas Gayler (i. e., Gaylord) and Joan, his wife (afterwards married to Giles Alwyn), whose wills follow, supplying the children of Nicholas, whose names he very inconsiderately omitted in his own will.

Joan Patten, the testatrix, was probably a daughter of one of the five sons Christopher, Hugh, William, John or Edmund, thus obtained but, as none of their wills have been discovered, it is, from the present view-point, impossible to say which. It seems evident that the William named in her will was that William of Dorchester, Mass., who died in 1673, aged nearly 88 years, and could not, therefore, have been her brother as both the putative parents had long been dead in 1585, and therefore he and his brother John, also of Dorchester, were probably her nephews. John was probably dead at the time of the making of her will (the last mention of him in our records being 1632), which accounts for his omission and strengthens the probability of the connection. Hugh Gaylord, of whom later, who remained in England but whose daughter Alice, wife of Richard Treat, came to America, could not for similar reasons of age, have been the brother Hugh of the will, but must also have been a nephew and probably a brother of the Dorchester emigrants. A brief sketch of what is known of these three may be of interest to the reader.

William Galler (as he signs himself in the Dorchester records) was a deacon at the gathering of the Church in Plymouth, England, in 1630. He came in the Alary & John the same year and made application for admission as Freeman, 19 October following, being admitted 18 May, 1631. He was Representative for Dorchester, 1635, 1636 and 1638. Removed to Windsor, Conn., and was Representative from that place for nearly 40* semi-annual sessions to 1664, and died 20 July, 1673, in his 88th year.

* Savage, II, 238; Stiles' Hist. Windsor, II, 278; Hibbard's Hist. Goshen, Conn., 452.


John Gaylord of Dorchester, Mass., brother of the above, was chosen by the town in 1632 to meet the Court of Assistance before any system of Representatives had been formed. His name does not occur again and he probably died soon after, corroboration of which is found in his omission from Joan Patten's will.*

Hugh Gaylaud of Pitminster, co. Somerset, in 1573 held lands in Poundisford, Smalecross and Lakemead in the Tything of South Trendle (now the parish of Trull), late of Nicholas Gaylerd, and held lands in Southgrove, in said tything, by surrender of Johane, widow of said Nicholas, for his residence. On 4 October, 1608, he had surrendered the close called Smalrest (sic, but see above), in the tything aforesaid, to his son George Gaylard.† His daughter Alice was baptized at Pitminster, 10 May, 1594, and married there, 27 April, 1615, Richard Trott (Treat), and came to America with her husband and their nine surviving children in 1630.
‡ They settled at Dorchester but soon removed to Wethersfield, Conn. Hugh Gaylord died at Pitminster and was buried there 21 October, 1614, His will, deposited in the Archdeaconry of Taunton, has unfortunately perished.§

* Savage, II, 238.
† Court Rolls, Manor of Taunton Deane, Somst.
‡ Treat Genealogy, pp. q, 18, 26.
§ Recorded in Calendars there, File 1614, No. 110.


Will of Nicholas Gayler of Pytmyster, (co. Somerset), dated 25 March, 1546. Being sick of bodie. My bodie to the holie sepulture of Pytmyster. Maintenance of the Church there viijd. Mayntenance of our Ladie service there viijd. To the light before the sacrament of the Aulter viijd. To the High Cross light viijd. To the sepulture light viijd., to the Torches viijd, and to the Belles viijd. I give to my ghostly father Sir Thomas Bicknam, to pray for me, xijd. I am in debte to John Parson of Pitmister xijs. xiijd., to Richard File of Trull iijs. iiijd., to William Finche of Wells vjs. viijd., to a thatcher of Wells iiijd., to John Spursaie of Pitmister xiijd., to John Shute of Trull vijs., and to John Morcombe of Trull vjs. viijd. I make Johan Gayler my wife my executrix of all my goods. Witnesses: Sir Thomas Bicknam, John Parson, John Durston. Proved 8 April, 1546.
(Arch. Taunton, Book I, f. 349.)

Will of Joan Alvyn of Pitmister, (co. Somerset), dated 29 August, 1572. To be buried in the churchyard at Pitmister. To Christopher my son £6-13-4. To William Gaylard my son a cow called Culver. To Mary Gaylard, daughter of William Gaylard, a cow called Tyttymus, the same to remain in the kepinge of Robert Manlye to the use and profit of the said Mary so long as he shall think good. To Elizabeth Gaylard, daughter of William Gaylard, a yeo shepe. To John my son
£20. To Elizabeth my daughter £20. To Mary my daughter £20, to be paid by Edmund my son. Residue to Hugh my son, whom executor. Supervisors: William Palmer and John Ivery. Witnesses: Robert Manley, Robert Baull, Henry Rewe. Proved 31 August, 1572.                                                                                                                                                                               (Taunton Wills, Book V, f. 13.)

Will of Giles Alvyn of Pitmister, (co. Somerset), dated 4 May, 1567. To Edmund Gaylard
£5. To John Gaylard £5. To Christopher Gaylard 40s. To Elizabeth Gaylard £8-6-8. To Mary Gaylard £8-6-8. To Hugh Gaylard £3-6-8. To Elizabeth and Mary Gaylard, children of William Gaylard, 4d. each. To John Luddon, Christopher, Roger, Elizabeth and Margerie, children of Hugh Luddon, 4d. each. To Robert White, William, George, Hugh, Johan, Elizabeth and Margaret, children of William White, 4d. each. To the children of Robert Lidden 4d. each. To the children of Thomas Lidden 4d. each. To every of my brothers and sisters 4d. To Andrew Howdon 4d. Residue to Johan my wife, whom executrix. Supervisors: John Iverie and Henry Rewe. Witnesses: John Iverie, Robert Ball, Henry Rewe. Proved 17 August, 1572.
(Taunton Wills, Book V, f. 33.)

Will of Harrie Vildue of Henton George (i. e. Hinton St. George), (co. Somerset), dated 2 June, 1546, witnessed by Robert Gaylard.
(Taunton Wills, Book I, f. 377.)

Will of Alice Hanninge of Fourland in the parish of Crewkerne, (co. Somerset), widow, dated 30 Oct., 1559. To Robert Gaylard a yeow and a platter.                                                                                                                                                                                           (Taunton Wills, Book III, f 149.)

Will of Antonie Gailerd of Langford Budfield, (co. Somerset), dated 25 Dec, 1565. To my son Nicholas I give my best cote. Residue to Julian my wife and Jone my daughter, whom executors. Witnesses: none. Proved 20 Feb., 1565-6.
(Taunton Wills, Book IV, f. 125.)

Will of John Gailerd of Stocklinch Mawdlen, (co. Somerset), dated 13 August, 7 Eliz. To John my son my best wean and wholes. To Margaret my daughter a cow called Redie, with a white patch in the buttock, and a crock of brass with long leggs. To Agnes my daughter a brazen crock and a potenger. To John Bremell v pounds of wull. Residue to Alice my wife, whom executrix. Witnesses: Nicholas Phillips, parson, Robert Jefferie, John Patterd, John Raynall. Proved 19 April, 1566.
(Taunton Wills, Book IV, f. 142.)

Will of Anthony Gaylard of Dillington in the parish of Ilmister, (co. Somerset), dated 10 May, 1572. Being sick in bodie. To be buried in the churchyard of Ilmister. To Margaret my daughter a cow and a heifer of twelve months old. To everie of of my children, that is to sale, to John Gaylard, Robert, William, Mary and Jone, 20s. apiece at their several ages of twenty years. Poor of Ilmister i2d. Residue to Jone my wife, whom executrix. Witnesses: Robert House, John Gaylard. Proved 18 May, 1573, by the executrix.                                                (Wells Wills, Book 17, f. 106.)

Will of Alice Chaplin of Draiton, (co. Somerset), widow, dated 23 April, 1576. To John Gaylard my son two acres of wheat. To Jane Gaylard, daughter of said John, a sucking calf. Legacies to Thomas Salwey my son, Jone Salway my daughter, and Margaret my daughter. Residue to Christian my daughter, whom executrix. Overseers: Thomas Hawker, Roger Roceter and William Doleman. Witnesses: Thomas Hawker, Roger Rosseter, William Doleman, Edmund Daw, John Daw, Thomas Ball, John Langedon, curate of Draiton. Proved 8 May, 1576.
(Taunton Wills, Book V, f. 247.)

Will of John Skriven of Dillington in the parish of Ilmister, (co. Somerset), dated 6 Feb., 1579-80, witnessed bv Robert Gaylord. (Wells Wills, Book 19, f. 88.)

Will of William James of Furland in the parish of Crewkerne, (co. Somerset), dated 14 April, 1581, witnessed by Geffrye Gallard.
(Taunton Wills, Book VI, f. 25.)

Will of Sir Thomas Stucky, clerk, parson of Stocklynch Ottersey, (co. Somerset), dated 27 June, 15S1. To Agnes Gaylard a platter. (Taunton Wills, Book VI, f. 43.)

Will of John Haninge of Crookerne, (co. Somerset), dated 15 Oct., 1581. To my brother in law Jefferie Gailerd los.
(Taunton Wills, Book VI, f. 136.)

Will of John Gaylard of Draiton, (co. Somerset), dated 10 Nov., 1587. Being sick of bodie. To the church 2s. To the poor men's box 6d. To my daughter Anne my great brazen panne and a bandise. To Henry my son my mault mill. To my son John my pair of lumbes with all things thereto belonging. Rest to Mary my wife, whom executrix. Witnesses: Richard Bettie, curate, William Baker. Proved 13 Jan., 1587-8.
(Taunton Wills, Book VII, f. 78.)

The will nuncupative of Roger Geylard late of Drayton, (co. Somerset), made the 1st day of Februarie, 1622-3. I give to my daughter Elizabeth
£40, my second best bed, and a malt gurnard; to my daughter Alice 6s. 8d.; to her children 3s. 4d.; and my will is that Samuel Geylard shall have the youse of the heifer I gave to Roger Geylard, son of Samuel Geylard. The rest of my goods I give to my wife and do make her executrix. Witnesses: Thomas Kingdon, Joan England, Edith Gaylard. Proved 24 April, 1623, by the executrix (not named). Sureties with the executrix: John Anneley of Curry Rivell, butcher, and Edmund Dawe of Drayton, yeoman.                                              (Taunton Wills, 1623, File 39.)

I Joan Gaylard of Barrington, co. Somerset, widow, being sick of body, do make this my last will and testament: I give to the parish church of Barrington 5 s.; to the poor of the said parish 5s.; and all other my goods I give to my son John Gaylard, whom I make my executor. Dated 15 August, 1630. /Signed: Joan Gaylard./ Seal: A swan. Witnesses: John Drayton, John Berintone. Proved 5 Nov., 1630, by the executor named.
(Taunton Wills, 1630, File 47.)

I John Gailard of Draiton, co. Somerset, mason, this thirtieth day of September (no year) do make this ray last will and testament: To be buried in the churchyard of Draiton. To mine eldest son John my great brass pott and my working tools. Item I give to my second son William my middle kettle, my cupboard, and two pewter dishes, all of which goods shall remain in the custody of my wife Alice so long as she live unmarried. All the rest of my goods I give unto my wife, whom I make executrix. Witnesses: William Baker, John Stapel. Proved 2 Dec, 1630, by
the executrix.                                                                                                                                                                                  (Taunton Wills, 1630, File 74.)

The 1st day of March, 1632-3, I Agnes Gaylerd of Ile Abbotts, co. Somerset, spinster, do make and ordain this my last will and testament: I give unto my sister Elizabeth Gaylard
£5 and all my goods except two bonds, which I give unto my brother Robert Gaylard, whom I make my whole executor. I give four shillings unto the poor of He Abbotts, to be distributed by John Gibbs and John Pytts. Witnesses: None. Proved 22 March, 1632-3, by the executor.                                                                                                                                                             (Taunton Wills, 1632, File 175.)

14 Nov., 1661, I Edmund Gaylard of Pitmister, co. Somerset, yeoman, being in good helth, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following: I give to the poor of Pitmister ten shillings. [To my daughter Mary Gaylard
£200 to be paid after my surrender of my two farthing-lands in the Tything of South Trendel in the Hundred of Pounsford. To Martha Gaylard my daughter £120. To Agnes Gaylard my daughter £100, to be paid within two years after my surrender of the said lands, which lands I have surrendered unto my son in law Joseph Stoden according to the custom of the Manor of Taunton and Taunton Dean, together with certain overlands, upon condition that he shall pay all my debts and legacies.]* To my daughter Mary the bedstead in the old parlor. To my daughter Martha my side bedstead in the old parlor. To my daughter Agnes Gaylard my little pottage pott. To my daughter Jone Sely one great chest and one coffer which Potter Sely her husband hath in his custody. To my daughter Joan's four children 40s. apiece at one and twenty. To Sarah Stodden, daughter of my son in law Joseph Stodden, 40s. at one and twenty. To Sarah Sely and Sarah Stodden one puter (pewter) dish apiece. The residue of my goods I give unto Joseph Stodden, my son in law, whom I appoint executor, and my brother George Gaylard and John Durston to be overseers. /Signed: Edmund Gaylard./ Witnesses: John Hawkritch, William Poole. Proved 18 April, 1663, by the executor.                            (Taunton Wills, 1663, File 93.)

* The portion in brackets is crossed out of the original.


9 September, 1665, I George Gaylard of Pitmister, co. Somerset, yeoman, being in good health, do make and ordain this my last will and testament: I give unto my son John threescore pounds, to be paid by my son George after the land comes into his hand. I make my wife Elizabeth executor. I give unto my son George four pound a year to be paid by my wife Elizabeth during her life out of the whome {home) living. I give to my son Joseph the low bed and bedstead in the kitchin chamber. I appoint ten acres that was Babb's, and ten that is Luscombe Hill, to be let out for two years. I desire George Staddier and John Streete to be overseers. /Signed: Georg Gaylard./ Witnesses: Richard Booth, Anthony Cade. Proved 1 June, 1667, by the executrix.                                                                                                           (Taunton Wills. 1667, File 82.)

19 August, 1673, I Thomas Gaylard of Chaffcombe, co. Somerset, being sick and weak of body, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following: First I bequeath my body to the christian burial in Chaffcombe. I give to my wife Elizabeth my bed and bedstead; to my son Elias 10s.; and to my son John Gaylard, to Thomas Gaylard, and to Edith Jennings 12d. apiece. All the rest of my goods I give to my son Henry Gaylard, whom I make my only executor. And my pleasure is that my wife Elizabeth, while she keeps herself in my name, shall have the use of certain {specified) household stuff. /Signed: Thom: Gaylard./ Witnesses: Elias Gyllett, John James, Hananell Palmer. Seal: A talbot or hound courant. No Probate. Inventory taken 23 August, 1675,
£63-19-0.
(Taunton Wills, 1675, File 19.)

The last of October, 1689, Samuel Gaylard, whilst he lived of the parish of Drayton, co. Somerset, made his last will nuncupative in these and the like words: I give unto the three children which I had by a former wife tenn pounds apiece, and the residue of his goods he gave unto Grace his relict, whom he made executrix, and this was putt in writing within six days after the testator's death according to the Act in that case provided. Published in presence of John Wines, William Wines, and Susannah Gooden. Proved 23 Nov., i68g, by Grace Gaylard, relict and executrix. Inventory of the goods of Samuel Gailard of Weeck Perham in the parish of Drayton, co. Somerset, deceased, taken
13 Sept., 1689: "Item 11 acres of wheat in house and in mow,
£15. Item for Lent corne £7. Item eight cowes, £19, four oxen £16-10, five horses £11-15, fourteen sheep £3, one chattle lease £1-12-6. Total of Inventory, £115-8.
(Taunton Wills, 1689, File 27.*)

* Four other Gaylard wills, calendared at Taunton, are now missing.


Drayton and Burton, Somerset: William Wylmote, in right of Agnes his wife, holdeth by copy dated 16 May, 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, one cottage containing three acres, with pasturage for two beasts, in Southmore, and one acre of wood in Drayton Wood, To hold to the said Agnes and to Roger Gaylard, son of John Gaylard, for the term of their lives, by the rent of 5s.
(Rentals and Surveys, Miscellaneous Books [Land Revenue], Vol. 255, f. 32.)
...

Source: Lea, J. Henry and Hutchinson, J. R., "Clues from English Archives Contributary to American Genealogy," The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 41, Jul 1910, pgs. 183-191 (pgs. 183-190 inclusive).


Probate Records

Name:    Richard Treat Sen
Location:    Wethersfield
Date of Will:    13 Feb 1668
Page:    72-3
Full Text:    Invt. œ69-10-08. Taken by John Deming, Robert Webster and John Nott. Will dated 13 February, 1668.The last Will & Testament of Richard Treat sen. of Wethersfield, Colony of Connecticut: Item: I give to my wife Alis Treat, after my decease, all the lands of what kinde soever I stand possessed of, within ye bounds of Wethersfield, and five acres of land lying in the dry swamp, of wch I have improved and pr pared for use, lying next my son James his land. Item. One peece of meddow lying in the great meddow comonly called by the name of send home. Item. The one halfe or eight acres next home of that peece of meddow comonly cald Filbarne. Item. The home lotte by the plaine land side. Item. Ye dwelling howse that I formerly lived in, with Convenient yeard room, and that end of ye barne on ye side the threshing flowre next the dwelling, with one halfe of that lotte belonging to ye said dwelling house lyeing next his son Richards howse & lotte, except my wife & son James shall agree otherwise. Item. All my pasture land fenced in, beyond my Daughter Hollisters lotte. Item. The use of two of my best Cowes, wch shee shall chuse, wch if they shall continue & Stand longer than my loveing wife liveth, they shall be my eldest sone Richard Treats. Item. I give to my wife the Handing bed, bedding, bedsted, wth all the furniture thereto belonging, with the use of so much of the houshold goods during her life time as shee shall judge needfull for her comfort, of what sort soever. Item. I give and bequeath to my eldest son, Richard Treat, the full possession & Confermation of the farme of Mayog, wth all ye Respective priveledges thereto belonging, with three of my youngest Heifers. Item. I give to my second sonne, Robert Treat, ten pounds. Item. I give to my youngest son, James Treat, besids the lands already made over to him, my Mill & grinding stone, fann, Timber chaine, Stilyeards, and my little bible. Item. I give to my sonn-in-law, Matthew Camfield, twentie pounds for that wch is remaining of his portion. Item. I give to my daughter Hollister fourtie shillings. Item. To my daughter Johnson ten shillings. Item. My debts being paid, I give to my loveing sons, John Demon and Robert Webster, equally, all the rest of my goods and Chattells whatsoever, except Mr Perkins Book, wch I give to my sonn John Demon, and my great bible to my Daughter Honour Demon, and that money in my Cousen Samuel Welles his hand unto my Cousen Daniel Demong, son of John Demon senir. And my desire is that my son-in-law John Demon, Robert Webster and Richard Treat would be my Overseers for their mutual helpfullness to my wife, & endeavor to see the accomplishment of this my last Will & Testamt. And for the Ratification hereof I have this 13th of ffebruary, 1668, set to my Hand & Seal.Richard Treat, sen.Court Record, Page 97--3 March, 1669-70: Will endorsed & Exhibited in Court, and, with the Invt., approved.
Source:    A DIGEST OF THE EARLY CONNECTICUT PROBATE RECORDS.1663 to 1677.

Source: Ancestry.com. Hartford, Connecticut Probate Records, 1639-1700 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. Original data: A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records, Hartford District, 1635-1700. Vol. I. n.p., 1906.


Cover page of Richard Treat's probate records

Inventory of Richard Treat

Inventory of Richard Treat

First page of Richard Treat's will

Second page of Richard Treat's will

From the will of Richard Treat

Source: Probate Files Collection, Early to 1880; Author: Connecticut State Library (Hartford, Connecticut); Probate Place: Hartford, Connecticut. Ancestry.com. Connecticut, Wills and Probate Records, 1609-1999 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Original data: Connecticut County, District and Probate Courts.


John Harvey Treat's The Treat Family

Pages 23:
THE TREAT FAMILY IN WETHERSFIELD.
No early trace of Richard Treat, or of any one bearing the name of Treat, has as yet been found in Massachusetts, but as Wethersfield was settled by colonists from Watertown, in the absence of any proof to the contrary, it had generally been assumed that he belonged to Saltonstall's colony which settled in Watertown in 1630. When and how the family came to Wethersfield is not known. They came to New England probably about 1637 or 1638, and were certainly here as early as 1639. Their youngest child, Katharine, was baptized June 29, 1637, in Pitminster, and they must have come subsequent to that event.


Pages 24-35:
Church dissensions throw a little light on the Treat family in Wethersfield. In 1656, a quarrel arose between Rev. John Russell and Lieut. John Hollister, whom he had excommunicated without giving him any reason for the act. A petition was presented to the General Court, Aug. 17, 1658 (Conn. Col. Rec. 1:370), signed by John Holister, Thomas Wright, sen., John Demminge, sen., John Edwards, sen., and Richard Smith, sen., and six females, among whom was Alice wife of Richard Treat, sen., and his daughter Joanna, wife of Mr. Hollister, all members of the church, and thirty-eight others not members of the church, but probably of the society, many of whom were men of high position, including Richard, James and Matlhias Treat, asking that Mr. Russell might be removed and another minister be substituted. The name of Richard Treat, sen., does not occur in this petition. He may have been away on a visit to his son Robert In Milford at that time. March 9, 1658-9, the Court sustained Lieut. Hollister in demanding that he should be informed of the nature of the charges upon which he had been excommunicated. They also observe that "whereas Mr. Treat, Mr. Holister, Jo : Demant [Deming] are desirous and willing to attend some regular way for the composing their differences, and to yt end desires some Chs: or prsons may be thought on, to lieare and determine tlie same : It is desired by the Courtt, that Wethersfield Ch : , wth
ye officer, would considr the matter and seasonably, wthout delay conclude if it can be, vpon some way that may effect the issueing their sad differences." (C. C. R. 1 : 330-1.) Oct. 9, 1659, the court took means to settle this quarrel by calling in the aid of the church at Hartford and that at Windsor. The difficulty was ended in that year by the withdrawal of the minister and his family to Hadley, Mass. (See Hollister, Hist, of Conn., 1 : 462 ; Hollister Genealogy, p. 19-23.)

Among the freemen of Wethersfield, Oct. 11, 1669, according to the Colonial Records, were "Richard Tret, sen., James Trett, . . . Richard Tret, junr." Robert Treat, son of Richard Treat, sen., had long before removed to Milford, and Matthias Treat, who had been made a freeman in 1657, had died in 1662.


RICHARD TREAT : FIRST GENERATION.
Richard1 Treat (Robert, Richard, William, John), was born 1584, in Pitminster, probably in the hamlet of South Trendle, now the parish of Trull, Somerset, England; baptized in Pitminster church, Aug. 28, 1584 ; died
—, 1669-70, in Wethersfield, Conn., was alive Oct. 11, 1669, and the inventory of his estate was presented to court, March 3, 1669-70; married, April 27, 1615, in Pitminster, Alice Gaylard, who was baptized May 10, 1594, in Pitminster, when her name was spelled Gaylaud, and the daughter of Hugh Gaylard, who was buried Oct. 21, 1614, in Pitminster, and whose will is recorded in the Taunton Probate Court in 1614, but has utterly perished. When Alice Treat died is unknown, but she survived her husband. The tradition that Alice was a second wife, and that the name of the first wife was Joanna, who was the mother of Mr. Treat's children, has proved, upon investigation, to be unfounded. The name of Hugh Gaylerd appears in the Taunton Manor Register, 1573, Poundisford, for two Messuages and two Furlongs of Bondland, and two acres of Overland in Smalecrosse, and one acre of Overland in Lakemead, in the Tythingof South Trendle, late of Nicholas Gaylerd, and the said Hugh first surrendered one acre of Bondland called Southgrove, in Tything aforesaid, by surrender of John Gaylard ( ? Johane widow of Nicholas) to hold to said Johane a Messuage and land for residence, &c. His name also appears in the Calendars in 1574, '81, '88, '92, '94, '96. Oct. 4, 1608, he surrendered a Close called Smalerest in the Tything of South Trendle, to son George Gaylard. Richard Treat was the son of Robert and Honora or Honour Trott (p. 16), and the grandson of Richard and Joanna Trott (p. 14), all of Pitminster. His great grandfather was probably William Trott (p. 14). of Staplegrove, and his great great grandfather, John Trott (p. 13) also of Staplegrove. He was baptized under the name of Trott, married under the name of Trett; his children were baptized by the names of Trott and Tratt, and he was called Treat when he died. The name of Treat first appears in 1647, and in 1664 he signed two dilferent documents under the name of Treat and Treate. I find the following in regard to Richard Treat, or Trott in the Taunton Manor Registers. This is an exact copy :

1600. Poundisford. "Ricua Trotte p. i mesuage et dimid virgat terr nat i cotag cum s. ptm et iiij acr terr de ourland in decem de southtrendle quond'm Hugonis Hollwell ex reddicoe Robti Trotte per s. Hend sub condicoe qd Honora Trotte relict eiusdem Robert Heat teneat et gardeat oia el singula p.miss Durant viduetat &c. Dat 4 Mar xlij Eliz. Bonds John Prist & Nichi Dolling."

Translation. "Richard Trotte for one Messuage and half a Virgate of Bondland, one Cottage with its Appurtenances, and four acres of Overland in the Tything of South Trendle, late held by Hugh Holwell, by surrender of Robert Trotte, to be hold by him under condition that Honora (Honour) relict of said Robert (Trotte) have hold and possess all and every of the Premises during her widowhood, &c. Given March 4th in the 42d year of Queen Elizabeth. Bondsmen, John Prist and Nicholas Dolling."

This is the same land that was once held by his grandfather Richard and father Robert Trotte, 1571-72 (page 15).

Also the same year, for four acres of Overland pasture in Hollimore in the Tything of South Trendle, late of Wm. Wills, by surrender of Robert Trotte, &c.; also for three acres of Overland, called Stoney Downe next the road in the Tything of South Trendle, late of Agnes Hering, by surrender of Robert Trott &c. ; also, for two Cottages with Courtyards containing (blank) in the Tything of South Trendle, late of Richard Aplyn, by surrender of Robert Trott, &c. See also the Calendars for 1601, '18, '19, '22, and '30.

The family lived in the hamlet of Trendle, now the parish of Trull, in the parish of Pitminster, a large parish and village 4 1/2 miles south of Taunton, now in the Hundred of Taunton Dean, in the Diocese of Bath and Wells. The soil is clay and the chief crops are wheat, oats, barley, roots and pasture land. The population was 1382 in 1881. The reservoirs of the Taunton water works are in this parish. Barton Grange, anciently the residence of the Priors of Taunton, is at the foot of the Blagdon Hills, and the park contains some magnificent oaks and elms. Blagdon 1 1/4 miles southwest, Howleigh 11/2 miles west, Feltham 1 3/4 miles south, and Lowton 2 miles west from the church, are hamlets in the parish. John and Robert Trott, doublless distant "cousins," now reside in the parish. According to Collingson's history of Somerset. p. 5, Vol. 1, in 1791, Pitminster comprised five hamlets: Blagdon, 47 houses; Leigh, 57 houses; Fulford, 23 houses; Trendle (now Trull), 30 houses; Duddleston, 28 houses. The village of Pitminster contained 38 houses, and the whole number of inhabitants was 1036. This manor, anciently called Pipeminstre and Pipplemenstre, is mentioned in the Domesday book, 1086, and was given by King Hardicnute to the church of Winchester. In the time of King Stephen, the church of Pitminster was appropriated to the priory of Taunton, by Henry de Blois, bishop of Winchester. It is dedicated to St. Andrew and St. Mary. The present structure is not very ancient but built upon the ruins of one of the Saxon times. It is eighty-eight feet long, and forty feet wide, in the perpendicular style, consisting of a chancel, nave, two side aisles, south porch and western tower with a spire and five bells. There are some ancient and richly carved benches, a finely carved stone pulpit and reredos, and some very interesting altar tombs to the Coles family, daling from the 16th and I7th centuries. Two of the windows are stained, The sittings are for four hundred people. (See frontispiece.)

Trull, anciently North and South Trendle, is a parish and village lying between Pitminster and Taunton, two miles south from the latter and on the high road to Honiton. It was formerly in the Hundred of Poundisford, now in that of Taunton Dean. The chief crops are wheat, barley and roots. In 1881, the population was 960. The church of All Saints formerly belonged to the priory of Taunton. The register of baptisms and burials dates from 1670; marriages, 1677. The earlier ones have been lost. The fabric is built of local stone, of the perpendicular period, consisting of chancel, nave of three bays, aisles, south porch, aud an embattled western tower of two stages, with pinnacles, and containing six bells. Some of the ancient 16th century benches have very richly carved ends. One represents the oridinary Sunday procession of a small parish church of the period, and includes (1) a boy in short surplice, carrying a cross; (2) a man in fleshed trunk hose and short surplice, carrying a candle or torch ; (3) a similar figure, wearing a maniple on the left arm and carrying a reliquary; (4) a man in a long surplice, holding an open book, probably a deacon or second priest; (5) the priest, vested in a fringed alb and embroidered cope, and holding an open book; neither holy water nor incense is shown. Another bench end represents the instruments of the Passion and the figure of a cock; two more bear the letters S and W respectively, the latter letter being upheld on the peaks of two birds; at the back of the furtherest seat are eight panels, ornamented with the linen pattern and bearing this inscription: ''John Waye Clarke here," and "Simon Warman, maker of this worke, Ano Dni 1560." Our ancestors must have sat in these very seats. On the back of the pulpit are figures of St. John the Evangelist, and the four Latin Doctors; there is an ancient screen of carved oak and six stained windows. The church was restored in 1862. (See Kelly's Somerset Directory, 1889, pp. 308, 309, 374.) If the early Trull registers had not perished they would doubtless supply many gaps in the family history.

SOCIAL RANK OF RICHARD TREAT.
Mr. Treat must have been a man of high social standing and of much influence in the town of Wethersfield, and in the colony of Connecticut. This ia evident from the various positions of trust occupied by him. Titles once meant something. Not every one, as at the present day, had Esq. attached to their names. Even the prefix Mr. or Master was a mark of importance. It was then a title fully as high as Honorable is now. Generally speaking, not more than five freemen in a hundred had the title of Mr., and very few of the deputies and magistrates.

By the General Court of Massachusetts, Sept. 21, 1631, "It is ordered, that Josias Plastowe shall (for stealing 4 basketts of corne from the Indians), returne them 8 basketts againe, be ffined V.l and hereafter to be called by the name Josias, & not Mr. as formerly hee vsed to be." (Mass. Records, 1 : 92.)

In the list of freemen of Wethersfield for 1659, only three besides Richard Treat, sr., are styled Mr., and he bore that title as early as 1642, and perhaps earlier. In 1695, out of a list of 114 legal inhabitants of Eastham, Mass., only two have the title of Mr., — Mr. Sunderland, who was the schoolmaster and held in high respect, and Mr. Treat the minister. It is said that Mr. Treat was a deputy from Wethersfield as early as 1637, but there is no proof of this so far as I know and it is doubtful whether he was there as early as that. Certainly he is not mentioned as one in the Connecticut Records before 1614. He was chosen a juror, June 15, 1643, — a high position then, generally occupied only by the most prominent persons, — and grand juror, Sept. 15 of the same year. (C. C. R. 1 : 88, 93.)

In April, 1644, he was chosen deputy, and was annually elected for fourteen years, up to 1657-8 (ib. 1 : 103).

He was elected assistant, or magistrate, eight times, from March 11, 1657-8 to 1665 (ib. 1 : 310).

Oct. 25, 1644, he and Mr. Wells were the committee from Wethersfield to receive money for maintaining scholars at Cambridge (ib. 1 : 112).

In 1654, he was chosen on a committee to lay out lands granted by the town.

In 1660, he was a townsman, an office answering to the present selectmen.

Oct. 4, 1660, he was appointed to examine Thirty mile Island, a valuable township, thirty miles from the mouth of the Connecticut, with a view to settlement.

In 1663, he was appointed to procure a minister. He also held various other offices of honor and trust, which have been mentioned on pages 20 and 21.

March 14, 1660-1, the General Court of Connecticut applied to King Charles II, for a charter for their colony, which was granted April 23, 1662. It was of a very liberal character. Richard Treat, and two of his sons-in-law, John Deming and Matthew Camfield, were among the patentees:

"CHARLES THE SECOND, BY THE GRACE of God, King of England, Scotland, France and Iieland, defender of the Faith, &c.; TO ALL to whome theis shall come, Greetinge: WHEREAS, by the several Navigaiηons, discoveryes & successfull Planta
ηons of diverse of our loveing Subjects of this our Realme of England, Several Lands, Islands, Places, Colonies and Plantaηons have byn obtained and settled in that parte of the Continent of America called New England, and thereby the Trade and Commerce there hath byn of late yeares much increased, AND WHEREAS, we have byn informed by the humble Petiηon of our Trusty and well beloved John Winthrop, John Mason, Samuel Willis, Henry Clerke, Matthew Allen, John Tappan, Nathan Gold, Richard Treate, Richard Lord, Henry Woolicott, John Talcott, Daniel Clerke, John Ogden, Thomas Wells, Obedias Brewen, John Clerk, Anthony Haukins, John Deming and Matthew Camfield, being Persons Principally interested in our Colony or Plantaηon of Conecticutt in New England, that the same Colony or the greatest parte thereof was purchased and obteyned for greate and valuable Conaideracons, And some other parte thereof gained by Conquest, and with much difficulty, and att the only endeavours, expence and Charge of them and their Associates, and those under whome they Clayme, Subdued and improved, and thereby become a considerable enIargement and addiηon of our Dominions and interest there, — NOW KNOW YEA" &c. (C. C. R. 2: 3-11.)

He was a member of Governor Winthrop's Council, Dec. 17, 1663, and July 1, 1664 (ib. 15 : 388).

Mr. Treat was also a man of considerable wealth for those times and an extensive land owner in Wethersfield. At the laying out of the Naubuc farms, which consisted of lands on the east side of the Connecticut river, within the limits of what was then Wethersfield, but now Glastonbury, in 1640, or as early as 1639, the town gave him a large tract of land, lot No. 36, 310 rods wide by the river, computing south from Roaring Brook, and extending back a long ways into the wilderness, some three miles. The exact size of this lot is not known, but is supposed to have contained about 900 acres. It was called the "farm of Nayog," and long known as the "Treat farm." Richard Treat, jr., inherited this farm. He also bought several homesteads. In 1641, he bought the house of John Whitmore, on the east side of High St., at the north end, with 12 1/2 acres of land around it, and also his lot No. 27, at Naubuc, of 54 acres. The same year, or a little earlier, he bought both of the homesteads of Matthew Mitchel, one on the east side, and the other on the west side of Broad St., both having dwelling houses and barns attached. He also purchased the homestead of Thurston Raynor, on the west side of Broad St., and his lot No. 6, containing 330 acres, across the river. These three — Whitmore, Mitchel, and Raynor — removed to Stamford, Conn. In 1659, he bought the homestead of Rev. John Russell, who went to Hadley, situated on the west side of Broad St. He gave away much of his properly while alive. One of the lots which he owned in 1641, remained in the family down to about 1855. It was on Broad street. No one by the name of Treat now (1890) lives in Wethersfield.

Autograph of Richard Treat, senior, and Alice Tret, his wife, Sept. 28, 1664:
Signatures of Richard Treat and Alice Treat


WILL OF RICHARD TREAT.
The last will & Testament of Richard Treate senr in the Colony of Connecticut in maner & forme as Followeth:
Imprimis I being weak & Infirm of body but of sound understanding & of competent memory doe resigne my soule to the Lord hoping to be Justified & saved by the merits of Christ, & my body to be biiryed. Item I give & bequeath to my loving wife Alis Treat after my decease all the lands of what kind soever I stand possessed of within the Bounds
of Wethersfield : viz : five acres of land lying in the dry swamp which I have Improved & prepared for use lyeing next my sonn James land. Item, one peice of meadow lyeing in the great meadow Commonly called by the name of Send Home. Item the one halfe or eight acres next Home of that peice of meadow commonly called fillbarne. Item the Home lott By the playne lain side. Item the dwelling house that I formerly lived in wth convenient yarde roome and that end of the Barne on this side the threshing Floare next the dwelling house, with the one halfe of that Lott belonging to the said dwelling house lyeing next his son Richards house & Lott except my wife & son James shall agree otherwise; Item all my pasture land fenced in beyond my daughter Hollisters lott: Item the use of Two of my best cowes which she shall chuse, which if they shall continue & stand longer than my loving wife liveth they shall be my eldest sonn Richard Treats; Item I give to my loving wife the standing bed bedding bedsted with all the furniture thereto belonging, wth the use of so much of the household Goods during her life time as she shall Judg needful for her comfort of what sort soever.
Item I give and bequeath to my eldest son Richard Treat the full possession & confirmation of the farme of Nayog, with all the respectiue privileges thereto belonging with Three of my youngest Heifers.
Item, I give to my second sonn Robert Treat Ten pounds.
Item, I give to my youngest sonn James Treate besides the Lands already made over to him my mill & grinding stone fann Timber Chaines, stillyards & my little bible;
Item I give to my sonn in law Matthew Campfield Twentie pounds for that which is remayning for his portion;
Item I give to my daughter Hollister Forty shillings. Item, to my daughter Johnson, Tenn shillings.
Item my debts being payed I give to my loving sons John Demon & Robert Webster, equally all the rest of my Goods & chattels whatsoever except Mr Perkins Booke which I
give to my sonn John Demon [Deming], & my great Bible to my daughter Honour Demon, & that money in my cousin Samuel Wells his hand, unto my cousin David Deming, son of John Demon senr & my desire is that
My sonn in law John Demon, Robert Webster and Richard Treat would be my overseers for their mutual helpfulness to my louing wife, & endeavoure to see the accomplishment of this my last will and Testament, and for the ratification hereof I have this Thirteenth day of February, 1668, set to my hand and seale
Richard Treat Sen :            (seal)

There is one expression in this document, "next his son Richards house," instead of "next my son Richards house," which would seem to indicate that Mr. Treat did not himself write the will, but that it was drawn up at his dictation. Probably he was too weak and infirm to do it personally.

The Inventory of his estate was exhibited in Court, March 3, 1669-70, and is as follows:
                Imp. Cattel & Swine                                                                               £34—00—00
Item several Goods in the house the particulars have       }
been valued which are those that followe                          }                             £05—06—00
in the Chamber next the Barne                                             }
In the other Chamber                                                                                           £05—15—00
More in the same chamber                                                                                 £02—16—00
To several In the Kitchen which have been valued at                                     £13—11—02
In the parlour                                                                                                          £03—12—06
Oates & Indian Corne & Salt                                                                                £04—10—00
                                                                                                                                _________________
                                                                                                                                £69—10—8

Jan : 69 aprised by
John Deminge                                                                                                      exhibited In Court
John Nott                                                                                                              March 3d 1669
Robert Webster                                                                                                                          70

Children born and baptized in Pitminster, England :
(1.) Honor,2 b.
— 1616; bapt. March 19, 1615-6; d. —; m, about 1637. John Deming. 
(2.) Joanna, b.
— 1618; bapt. May 24, 1618; d. Oct. — 1694; m. — John Hollister.
(3.) Sarah, b. — 1620; bapt. Dec. 3, 1620; d. —; m. about 1644, Matthew Campfield.
(4.) Richard, b.
—, 1622-3; bapt. Jan. 9. 1622-3; d. about 1693; m. about 1661, Sarah Coleman.
(5.) Robert, b.
— 1624-5; bapt. Feb. 25, 1624-5; d. July 12, 1710; m., 1st, — Jane Tapp; 2d, Oct. 24, 1705, Mrs. Elizabeth (Hollingsworth) Bryan, dau. of Michael Powell, of Boston.
(6.) Elizabeth, b.
— 1627; bapt. July 25, 1627; d. —; m. about 1649, George Wolcott.
(7.) Susanna, b.
— 1629; bapt. Oct. 8, 1629; d. — 1705; m. about 1652, Robert Webster.
8. Alice, b.
— 1631-2; bapt. Feb. 16, 1631-2; buried Aug. 2, 1633, in Pitminster.
(9.) James, b.
— 1634; bapt. July 20, 1634; d. Feb. 12, 1709, In his 75th year; m. Jan. 26, Rebecca Lattimer.
10. Katharine, b.
— 1637; bapt. June 29, 1637; d. —; m. Nov. 29, 1655, Rev. William Thompson, or Tomson, of New Haven, by Gov. John Endecott, at Boston, according to the Boston Records. He was the son of William and Abigail Thompson, who came from England about 1637, and settled in Braintree, Mass. He graduated at Harvard in 1653, and was a preacher in Springfield, Mass., in 1654-6. In March, 1657, he came to Stonington, Conn., with his family. Was employed by the Commissioners of the United Colonies acting for the London Society "for Propagating the Gospel in New England," as a Missionary to the Pequot Indians, in 1658, at Wastuxet, in Westerly, R.I. Mr. Stanton, then Interpreter General of New England, was employed by the Commissioners as Interpreter to Mr. Thompson. About 1659, he resided in New London, Conn. After 1661, his salary from the Society was withdrawn as he neglected the business, probably from ill health. March 14, 1660-1, he was made a freeman of Connecticut. In 1663, he left New London in feeble health, and in Sept. 1664, was in Surry Co., Va. Oct, 11. 1664, he made a tender of his property to the Court of Magistrates at Hartford, for the liquidation of a debt, being about to remove to Virginia; and Oct. 13, the Court ordered the Constable of New London to take possession of his property. June 29, 1665, he wrote a letter from Pixford Bay, Va., to his "Loving brother Mr. James Treat of Wethersfield," authorizing him to sell property in New London, and that the last that we hear of him. His death probably occurred soon after, though the date is unknown. Richard Treat in his will. Feb. 15, 1668-9, mentions "my daughter Johnson," but as the Boston Records state explicitly that she married Mr. William Thompson, who also calls James Treat "brother", meaning brother-in-law, the name Johnson mast be a mistake or a misreading, for Tomson or Tompson,— and the mistake could occur very easily from a similarity of appearance of the names in writing,— or Johnson may have been the name of a second husband, though he is never heard of elsewhere. In the copy of Mr. Treat's will on record now at the State House, Hartford, Conn., the name is plainly Johnson. We have no record of any children. (See Sibley's Biographical Sketches of Graduates of H. U., pp. 354-367, Vol. 1.)

Source: Treat, John Harvey, The Treat Family: A Genealogy of Trott, Tratt, and Treat for Fifteen Generations, and Four Hundred and Fifty Years in England and America, Salem, MA: The Salem Press Publishing & Printing Company, 1893.


Stiles's Families of Ancient Wethersfield

Page 711:
Richard Treat in Families of Ancient Wethersfield, part 1 of 2
Richard Treat in Families of Ancient Wethersfield, part 2 of 2

Source: Stiles, Henry R., Families of Ancient Wethersfield Connecticut, Part 1, 1904, (reprinted by Heritage Books, Westminster, MD, 2006).


Starr's Various Ancestral Lines of James Goodwin and Lucy (Morgan) Goodwin

Pages 247-261:
THE FAMILY OF RICHARD TREAT
In the Treat Genealogy compiled by John Harvey Treat of Lawrence, Massachusetts, and printed in 1893, are extracts from the Parish Register of the church of St. Andrew and St. Mary, Pitminster, Somersetshire, England.
From these extracts, it appears that RICHARD TREAT, son of Robert, was baptized at Pitminster, August 28, 1584, and that he married April 27, 1615, ALICE GAYLORD, daughter of Hugh Gaylord.
The Register also gives the baptisms at that place of their ten children, from March 19, 1615-'16 to June 29, 1637, inclusive.1
The next known of Richard Treat is at Wethersfield, Connecticut, where on
"The 7th month (September) & 6th Daie 1641",
there is recorded to him as having bought of John Whitmore,
"One peece wheron his howse & barne standeth con : twelue acor on halfe more or lesse the ands abutt against the comon or landing place & pte against the house lott of Wm Butler late Ro : Bates his house lott west & the mea : of ffran : Norton east the sids against the lands of Wm Butler Tho : Curtice North & the lands of Tho : Whitwaie ffran : Norton Mr Denton John Jessop & Tho : Colman South./ "

At the same time he also bought of John Whitmore eight other pieces of land in the Beaver Meadow, Wet Swamp, Dry Swamp, West Field, Pennywise and on the east side of the Connecticut River, all in Wethersfield.2
The above home-lot was recorded to Whitmore on the 5th of April 1641,3 five months earlier than when recorded to Richard Treat.
John Whitmore was one of the party that removed from Wethersfield in 1641 and founded the town of Stamford.
The conclusion is that Richard Treat bought the Whitmore property between April 5, 1641, and September 6 of the same year.
It is improbable that Richard Treat, a man of means, and with his large family of wife and nine children, should have been living in Wethersfield for any length of time before owning a home.
The statement has been made he must have emigrated to America as early as 1639, because his son Robert, who was then only fourteen years old, was living in Milford that year and was one of the committee that divided the lands of that town among its inhabitants.
It is an unheard of thing that a minor should have been appointed to any official position, and particularly to one of such importance as that just mentioned.
It is not generally known that the oldest volume of records of the town of Milford is not in existence; the present first volume was made by a committee chosen January 7, 1677,
"to Transcribe out of ye Old books what is Necessary and of use to be Taken out of them and written in ye New book as Grants of Land &c"4

The first entry in this digest reads,
"Nouember 20th 1639"
"Those persons whose names are here vnder written are allowed To be free planters hauing for the present liberty to act In the Choyce of publique officers for the Carrying on publique Aflfaires in this plantation."

Under this entry are the names of these forty-four men :
"Zachariah Whitman             
Henry Stonhill                        Thomas Lawrance   
Thomas Welsh                        
Nathaniel Baldwin               Thomas Samford      
Thomas Wheeler                    
James Prudden                   Timothy Baldwin    
Edmond Tappe                      
Thomas Baker                      Georg Clarke Junr     
Thomas Buckingham             
George Clarke Senr            John Burwell   
Richard Miles                          
George Hubburt                  Henry Botsford     
Richard Platt                           
Jasper Gunn                        Joseph Baldwin      
Thomas Topping                     
John ffletcher                      Philip Hatly         
M'' Peter Prudden                   
Alex: Bryan                           Nicholas Camp     
William fifowler                         ffrances Bolt                        John Rogers
John Astwood                         Micah Tomkins                     Thomas Vffett
Richard Baldwin                      John Birdsey                         Nathaniel Briscoe
Benjamin ffenn                        Edmond Haruy                     Thomas Tibballs
Samuell Coley                         John Lane                             John Sherman
John Peacocke                      William East"5

Immediately following this list of names appears this vote:
"The power is Setled in the Church to Chuse persons out of them [selues] To Diuide the lands into Lotts, as they shall haue light from the [word] of God, and to take order for the timber."5


Directly after this entry are these nine names :
"Robert Plum                            John Baldwin                         William Brookess
Roger Terrel                             William Slough                        Robert Treat
Joseph Northrupp                   Andrew Benton                     Henry Lyon"5

The New Haven Colony Records make it clear that up to October 23, 1643, except in the case of six persons, the town of Milford had required church membership as a prerequisite to admission as freeman.6
An examination of the original records, still extant, of the First Church of Milford shows that on November 20, 1639, the date given at the beginning of the Town Records, there were but eight men who were members of the church.
The names of these eight are not entered in the list of free planters in the order of their admission to the church, as the Church Records prove, nor are those of the thirty-six following.
Thomas Wheeler, the third person named in this list was not admitted to the church until August 9, 1640, and three of the seven organizing members of the church August 22, 1639, are named after one who was not admitted until July 2, 1640.
It is strongly suspected that on the original record considerable space was left after the first entry in the book and before the second entry regarding the qualification of church membership for appointment on town committees.
As the names now appearing in this space were entered either from time to time or as a whole several years later, the allotted space became filled and the nine names following the second vote are believed to be a continuation of this list of free planters.
They could not be the names of church members appointed for committee work at that date, November 20, 1639, as Robert Plum, the first one named, did not become a church member until August 4, 1644, and Joseph Northrupp, the earliest of these nine to become a church member, was not admitted until March 27, 1642.
March 9, 1639-'40 is the date of the entry on the Town Records immediately following this list of nine names and thereafter the entries run in chronological order.
These facts strengthen the suspicion that these two lists of forty-four and nine names respectively, fifty-three in all, should be taken together as the list of the free planters of the town up to April 19, 1649, when Robert Treat, next to the last one named in the list, was admitted to membership in the Milford Church, and has no other significance.
Robert Treat was evidently living in Wethersfield September 26, 1647, for at a town meeting held there on that date
"Nath Dickinson" and "Robert Tratt"' were appointed a committee to make a rate for the raising of £25 to defray the debts owing by that town.8
Possibly Robert Treat was living in Milford in 1648 when his son Samuel was baptized there on the 3rd of August or September of that year, as the imperfect date on the Milford Church Records indicates, the father Robert, according to the entry, still being a "memb"" of ye church of Wethersfield."9
There are no lands in Milford recorded to Robert Treat until February 23, 1649-'5010 although he and his wife Jane were admitted to membership in the Milford Church April 19, 1649, ten months earlier.

Because of all these facts, it is believed that Richard Treat, head of the Connecticut Treat family and father of Robert, did not emigrate to America and certainly did not appear in Wethersfield, much if any before 1641.
Richard Treat added to his Wethersfield holdings of September 1641, by purchasing November 28 of the same year, from Thurston Rayner the latter's homestead of four acres and six other pieces, aggregating four hundred and thirty-nine acres.11
October 27, 1643, he bought the homestead and other lands of Matthew Mitchell, comprising two hundred and thirty acres.12
These various parcels amounted in all to more than six hundred and sixty acres, and their purchase discloses real estate transactions of magnitude, very rare for that time and unusual even at a later date.

One year after his first purchase of lands in Wethersfield, he entered upon his notable public life.
Among the records of a session of the General Court of Connecticut, held September 29, 1642, appears this entry:
"That the Country may be better enabled to kill yearely some Beves for supply of Leather,
"It is Ordered, that no Calues shall be killed wthin these Plantations, wthout the approbation of two men wthin ech Towne, by the Court to be
appoynted for that searuice, vppon forfeture of ten shillings to the Country".......................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
"for Wethersfield, Leo : Chester, Rich : Trotte."13

At another meeting of the Court held December 1, 1642,
"The Gour, Mr. Heynes, Mr. Hopkins, Mr. Whiting, Capten Mason, Mr. Chester, Mr. Hill and Mr. Trott are desiered to take the accoumpt of what the seuerall Townes will disburse toward the building of a Shippe, (and if they find yt phesable,) they haue power to agree wth workemen to carry on the worke and to take ingadgements of the Country to prforme what they vndertake, and to doe all things requisit for the full accomplisheing of the worke."14

It is noteworthy that within so short a time after Richard Treat's appearance in Connecticut, he should have been selected to serve on a committee among the leading men of the colony, such as the Governor and four of the Magistrates.
Mr. Treat's ability was already being recognized at this early date.
He served on the jury of the Particular Court in June and September 1643, October 1645, December 1647 and December 1648.15
On page 27 of volume I of Wethersfield Town Votes is entered an agreement regarding the payment, between April 22 and the last of September 1647, to Nathaniel Dickinson, of a debt owing him by the town. The document is signed by "Richard Tratt" and "Robert Parke", who it is suspected were acting at that time in the capacity of Townsmen.
The records of the town meetings held February 17, 1653-'54 and February 24, 1654-'55, show that Richard Treat was elected a Townsman on those dates.16
In the agreement with George Fenwick for the purchase of the Saybrook Colony, he was to receive a duty on corn and other produce which should pass out of the Connecticut River. He was also to be paid a tax on cattle and horses owned in each of the river towns, and on swine killed therein.17
In accordance with this agreement, the General Court in December 1645, appointed one man in each of the three towns to collect the tax due under the agreement.
"Mr. Trotte" was appointed for Wethersfield.18
Like other early New England towns, the seating or dignifying of the meeting house was done by a committee appointed in town meeting.
December 28, 1649, "Mr Trat Sam: Smith senior & Nath Dickinson" were chosen such a committee.19
The history of Wethersfield in regard to its early ministers is not pleasant reading.

Bitter quarrels arose between Reverend Henry Smith and some of the inhabitants, and his successor Reverend John Russell had a similar experience.
At a town meeting held April 16, 1658, it
"was uoated that sixe men should be chousen to tret with Mr Russel to nowe wether he doth intend to remoue from us or taray with us, Mr. Trat, Mr Hollester, John Demon, Tho : Curtis, Tho : Standish Sam. Boreman and so to re turne ansuer to the toune."20

In the Deming sketch is given a petition to the General Court, dated August 17, 1658, in which Mr. Russell is accused, among other things, of taking a "sinfull" oath.
The petition was signed by five male and six female members of the church, among the latter of whom was "Alc Treate", and by thirty-nine other residents of the town, among whom was "Richard Treate", husband of Alice.
Lieutenant John Hollister, son-in-law of Richard Treat, had been summarily excommunicated from the Wethersfield Church, probably because of his opposition to Mr. Russell.
The matter was brought before the General Court, March 9, 1658-'59, and the church was ordered to disclose on what grounds Mr. Hollister was expelled.
The record of that date further shows that,
"whereas Mr. Treat, Mr. Hollister, Jo : Demant, are desirous and willing to attend some regular way for the composing their differences, and to yt end desire some Chs: or prsons may be thought on, to heare and determine the same; It is desired by the Court, that Wethersfeild Ch:, wth ye officer, would considr the matter and seasonably, wthout delay, conclude if it can be, vpon some way that may effect the issueing their sad differences."21

The removal of Mr. Russell from Wethersfield left a vacancy in the pastorate, and March 24, 1658-'59, "Mr Tratt" and four others were appointed a committee to procure "a setled and an aproved minister".22 He was chosen on similar committees in September 1663, July 1664 and September 1667.23

In February 1660-'61 he was on a committee to secure a house for the minister.24
Within four years after his arrival in Wethersfield, Richard Treat was elected a Deputy to the General Court, appearing first at the session of April 1644. He also served at the sessions of September 12, November 15 and December 11, 1644; April 10, July 9, September 11, October 8 and December 1, 1645; April 9 and October 30, 1646; January 28, 1646-'47, May 20, June 2 and September 9, 1647; February 23 and March 9, 1647-'48; May 18, September 14 and December 6, 1648; January 25 and March 14, 1648-'49; May 17, June 6, September 13, October 10, November 7 and December 5, 1649; March 20, 1649-'50; May 16, October 9 and 31, 1650; February 5 and March 19, 1650-'51 ; May 15, September 11 and October 6, 1651 ; May 20, June 30, September 9 and October 6, 1652; February 23, 1652-'53; April 14, May 18, July 28, August 11, September 8, October 21 and 29 and November 23 and 30, 1653; March 1 and 6, 1653-'54; April 6, May 18, July 11, September 14 and October 3, 1654; March 7, 1654-'55 ; May 17 and October 4, 1655 ; March 26 and May 15, 1656; February 26, 1656-'57; April 9, May 21, August 12 and October 1, 1657 and March 11 and 24, 1657-'58, making in all seventy sessions.25
At the session of October 25, 1644, action was taken regarding
"the mayntenaunce of scollers at Cambridge",
and two men were
"appoynted in euery Towne wthin this Jurisdiction, who shall demaund what euery family will giue, and the same to be gathered and brought into some roome, in March; and this to continue yearely as yt shalbe considered by the comissiors.
"The prsons to demand what will be giuen are"
..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
"For Wethersfield, Mr. Trott, Mr. Wells."26


At a session of the General Court held March 11, 1657-'58, nominations for the office of Magistrate or Assistant were made to be voted for at the annual election of that year; one of those nominated was "Mr. Treat Senior of Wethersfeild".27
The nomination of Richard Treat to that office was confirmed by the people and his election declared at the "Court of Election", which opened May 20, 1658.28
He was continued in this office until May 1665,29 serving his last term as Assistant at the advanced age of eighty years.
In October 1660, a committee consisting of a Magistrate and Deputy from each of the three towns, Hartford, Windsor and Wethersfield, with John Hart of Farmington, was appointed to view and dispose of the lands for a plantation at "30 Miles Island", now Haddam.
"Mr. Treat Senr" was the Magistrate appointed from Wethersfield.30
Among the acts of a General Assembly held at Hartford, March 11, 1662-'63, we find one as follows:
"This Court doth order that in ye vacancy of the sitting of the Generall Court, there shalbe a Councill, consisting of the Assistants here on the Riuer, or such as can convene, to ye number of fiue at least, to act in emergt occasions that concerne ye welfare of this Colony. And hereby doe authorize the said Councill to act in all necessary concernments, both miletary and civill, according as the prsent exegents require
and call for."31

From the papers of Governor Jonathan Trumbull preserved in the library of the Massachusetts Historical Society and some of which are printed in the Society's Collections, we learn that at a meeting of the Council held at Hartford, April 2, 1664, at which were present Governor John Winthrop and four of the Assistants, three men were appointed as Commissioners with magisterial powers, for the town of Wickford and "the places adjoining within the Colony of Connecticott".
Richard Treat was one of the Assistants present at this meeting.32

Among the steps taken to procure a charter for the Connecticut Colony was the action of the General Court held March 14, 1661-'61, when it was declared that
"it is our duty and very necessary to make a speedy address to his Sacred Maiesty, our Soveraigne Lord Charles the Second, King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, to acknowledge our loyalty and allegiance to his highnes, hereby declareing and professing ourselues, all the Inhabitants of this Colony, to be his Highnes loyall and faythfull subjects. And doe further conclude it necessary that we should humbly petition his Maiesty for grace and fauour, and for ye continuance and confirmation of such privilidges and liberties as are necessary for the comfortable and peaceable settlement of this Colony."33

At the same time an appropriation of I 500 was made to meet the expenses of the transaction, and on the 7th of June following, the Treasurer was authorized to sign a letter of credit for that amount, in behalf of the Governor who was deputed as the colony's agent to proceed to England to obtain a charter from the King.34
Document 330 in the Collections of the Robert C. Winthrop Papers in the Connecticut State Library reads thus:
"Wee whose names are vnder written being Magestrates of this Colony of Conecticut doe hereby declare and Testify to all whom it may concerne that Capt John Talcot is ye Treasurer for the said Colony of Conecticutt and that he had spetiall order from ye Generall Court of the said Colony to signe and deliuer a Letter of Credit to ye Right Worshipll: John Winthrop Esqr and Gouernor of the Aforesaid Colony to ye value of ffiue hundred pounds sterling to be paid in provisions or such vsuall pay of this Countrey for which he shal charg Bills to Ye Treasurer of this said Colony of Conecticut and that the said Treasurer hath order vpon ye Receipt of any Bills from ye Right Woppll: John Winthrop Esqr for ye said sum or any part thereof to make due and ful payment thereof according to ye Tenour of ye said Bills.
                                                                                                                                                                                 Samll Willys
                                                                                                                                                                                 Mathew Allyn
                                                                                                                                                                                 William Phelps.

  Signature of Richard Treat

With the instructions given to Governor Winthrop for his guidance in securing the Charter was a Hst of the names of those persons to whom it was desired that the Charter should be issued in behalf of the colony.
Among these men was Richard Treat and his name appears eighth in that memorable document.35
It has been shown that Richard Treat, by purchase of John Whitmore, Thurston Rayner and Matthew Mitchell, became the owner of a large landed estate in Wethersfield, part of which lay on the east side of the Connecticut River.
In April 1653, the town granted him as an addition to his farm on the east side of the river a tract of land, the full width of his farm and extending eastward three miles.36
September 17, 1659, he bought of the Reverend John Russell on the latter's removal to Hadley, his homestead in Wethersfield."
On page 120 of the first volume of Wethersfield Land Records is an undated entry showing the transfer from Richard Treat to his son Richard, of lands at "Noyake", now a part of the town of Glastonbury. The tract fronted on the river three hundred and ten rods or nearly one mile.
Prior to February 28, 1656, part of the homesteads of Thurston Rayner and Samuel Hubbard had been transferred to Richard Treat Junior, who sold them to Thomas Colman.38
On folio 112 of volume 2 of the Wethersfield Land Records is entered a deed dated September 28, 1664, whereby Richard Treat Senior,
"in consideration of the fatherly loue and natarall affection which I haue and bare unto my beloued Sonn James Treat of weathersfield",
conveyed to the said James seven pieces of land in Wethersfield. The first was a home-lot of three acres with a dwelling house and barn thereon, and was bounded southeast on Broad street, southwest on the home-lot of John Riley, northwest on Rose Lane and northeast on land of Richard Treat.

The second piece was another home-lot of three and one-fourth acres and was bounded northwest on Broad street and northeast on the way leading into the plain.
The other pieces, aggregating two hundred and fourteen and one-half acres, were located at "Fill Barne" and "Send Home" in the Great Meadow, the Long Row in Dry Swamp, the West Field and Mile Meadow.
The title to these lands was not to take effect until after the deaths of the grantor and his wife. The deed was witnessed by Hugh Welles and "Alce" Treat.
March 3, 1668-'69, he also gave his son James the title to five acres of land at the upper end of Mile Meadow.39

The will of Richard Treat made February 13, 1668-'69, which is herewith given in full, shows that at that date his wife "Alis" was living.
How much longer she lived after the date of this document is now unknown.
He was living as late as October 1669, when he was enrolled among the freemen of Wethersfield.40 He must have died within the next three months, for in January 1669-'70 an inventory of his estate was taken. This with the will was presented to the County Court, March 3, 1669-'70.41
"The last will and Testament of Mr Richard Treatt senior of Wethersfeild in the Collonie of Conecticotte in mannor and forme as followeth"
"Imprimis I being weak and infirme of body, but of sound vnderstanding and of competent memory, doe resigne my soull to the lord hopeing to be Justified & saued by the merrit of christ and my body to be buried.
"Item I giue and bequeath to my loueing wife Alis Treatt after my decease all the lands of what kinde soeuer, I stand possessed of within ye bounds of Wethersfeild vid : fine acres of land lyeing in the dry swompe wch I haue jmproued and prpared for use lyeing next my son James his land. Item one peece of meddow lyeing in the great meddow comonly called by the name of send-home. Item the one halfe or eight acres next home of that peece
of meddow comonly cald filbarne Item the home lotte by the plaine lane side Item ye dwelling house that I formerly liued in with Convenient yeard room and that end of ye barne on ys side the threshing fioure next the dwelling howse with the one halfe of that lotte belonging to ye said dwelling howse lyeing next his son Richards howse & lotte except my wife & son James shall agree other wise. Item all my pasture land fenced in beyond my Daughter Hollisters lotte Item the use of two of my best Cowes wch shee shall chuse wch if they shall continue & stand longer then my loueing wife liueth, they shall be my eldest sone Richard Treatts Item I giue to my loueing wife the standing bed bedding bested wch all the furniture thereto belonging with the use of so much of the houshold goods dureing her life time as she shall judge need full for her comforte of what sort soeuer
"Item I giue and bequeath to my eldest son Richard Treat the full possession & confermation of the farme of Nayog
wth all ye respectiue Priueledges therto belonging with three of my youngest heifers
"Item I giue to my second sonne Robert Treat ten pounds
"Item I giue to my youngest sonne James Treatt besides the lands already made ouer to him my mill & grinding stone fanne timber chaine stilyeards and my little bible
"Item I giue to my sonn in law Mathew Camfeild twentie pounds for that
wch is remaineing of his portion
"Item I giue to my Daughter Hollister fourtie shillings
"Item to my Daughter Johnson ten shillings
"Item my debts being paid I giue to my loueing sons John Demon and Robert Webster equally all the rest of my goods and chattells whatsoeuer Except mr Perkins Book
wch I giue to my sonn John Demon and my great bible to my Daughter Honour Demon and that moeny in my Cousen Samuell Wells his hand vnto my Cousen Dauid Demon son of John Demon senior, and my desire is that my son in law John Demon Robert Webster and Richard Treat would be my ouerseers for their mutuall helpfullness to my loueing wife & endeauoure to see the accomplishmt this my last will & testamt:
"And for the Ratification heerof I haue this thirteenth of ffebruary 1668 set to my hand & seall
                                                                                                                                                                           Richard Treat                                seal

"An Inuentory of
ye Estate of Mr Richard Treat Senior of (wethersfeild) deceased"
"Imp: Cattell and swine                                                  -                 -                  341 -00 — 00
Item Seuerall Goods in
ye house ye
    perticulars haue been Valued are these
        that follow
In
ye chamber next ye barne -                                     -                 -                   05 — 06 — 00
In
ye other chamber                -                                     -                 -                   05—15—00
More in
ye same chamber                                          -      -                                02 — 16 — 00  
To seueralls in
ye kitchen wch haue been
                                                         ualued at                                                     
131-11 — 02
In
ye parlour                                                                  -                   -                    03 — 12 — 06    
   oats & indian corn & salt                                          -                   -                   04 — 10 — 00
                                                                                                                               ______________
                                                                                                                                69=10=08"
"Jan : 69. prised by
                                     John Deminge
                                     John Not
                                     Robert webster"42

Richard Treat was unquestionably one of the wealthiest men of Wethersfield of his day.
His will made within twelve months of his death indicates that he owned considerable real estate at that time.
The Wethersfield Records do not show any transfer of this property by him and it is very peculiar that it does not appear in the inventory.
Moreover the amount of personal estate mentioned therein evidently does not include all he possessed.
Beyond accepting and recording his will and inventory, nothing was done by the County Court.
That such was the case still remains a mystery.

CHILDREN OF RICHARD AND ALICE (GAYLORD) TREAT
Honour                bap. Mar. 19, 1615-'16;43    mar.      John Deming44 of Wethersfield, Conn.
Joanna               "         May 24, 1618
;43          "            John Hollister45 of Wethersfield, Conn.
Sarah                  "         Dec 3, 1620
;43             "            before Oct. 19, 1645, Matthew Canfield46 of New Haven and Norwalk, Conn., and
                                                                                               Newark, N.J.

Richard              bap. Jan. 9, 1622-'23
;43       mar.      before Feb. 14, 1661-2, Sarah Colman,47 and lived in Wethersfield, now Glastonbury, Conn.
Robert                "        Feb. 25, 1624-'25
;43     "            1, before Sept., 1648, Jane Tapp.48
                                                                                       
2, Oct. 24, 170S, Elizabeth ( ) Hollingsworth Bryan,49 and lived in Milford, Conn., Newark, N. J.,
                                                                                            and again in Milford, Conn.

Elizabeth            "        July 25, 1627
;43            "            before June 20, 1650, George Wolcott50 of Wethersfield, Conn.
Alice                   "        Feb. 16, 1631-2
;43      bur.        Aug. 2, 1633.43
James                "        July 30, 1634
;43           mar.      Jan. 26, 1664-5, Rebecca Latimer,51 and lived in Wethersfield, Conn.
Katharine          "         June 29, 1637
;43         "             Nov. 19, 165s, Rev. William Thomson52 of Springfield, Mass., New London, Conn., and
                                                                                                      , Virginia.
 

1The Treat Family, by John Harvey Treat, Salem, Mass., 1893, pp. 9, 26.
2Wethersfield, Conn., Land Records, vol. I, p. 118.
3Ibid., vol. I, p. 213.

4Milford, Conn., Land Records, vol. 9, reverse end, p. 14.
5
Milford, Conn., Land Records, "vols, I & 2", p. I.
6New Haven Colonial Records, vol. I, pp. no, in.
7The family name has undergone various changes. On the early records the surname was written sometimes Tratt and again Trotte.
In 1647 Richard the founder of the American family signed his name on the Wethersfield Records as Richard Tratt.
Eight years later or September 23, 1655, as an appraiser of the estate of Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield, he subscribed his name Richard Treat and thereafter, or for the last fifteen years of his life, he appears to have adhered to this form of the name.
8Wethersfield, Conn., Town Votes, vol. I, p. 27.
9Milford, Conn., First Church Records, unpaged.
10Milford, Conn., Land Records, "vols, I & 2", p. 118.
11Wethersfield, Conn., Land Records, vol. I, p. 119.
12Ibid., vol. I, p. 121, and original document preserved in the Henry Whitfield House, Guilford, Conn.
13Colonial Records of Connecticut, vol. I, p. 75.
14Ibid., vol. I, pp. 77, 80.
15Colonial Records of Connecticut, vol. I, pp. 88, 93, 132, 159, 172.
16Wethersfield, Conn., Town Votes, vol. I, pp. 26, 44.
17Colonial Records of Connecticut, vol. I, pp. 266-270.
18Ibid., vol. I, pp. 134-135.
19Wethersfield, Conn., Town Votes, vol. I, p. 35.
20Wethersfield, Conn., Town Votes, vol. I, p. 53.
21Colonial Records of Connecticut, vol. I, pp. 330-331.
22Wethersfield, Conn., Town Votes, vol. I, p. 58.
23Ibid., vol. I, pp. 77, 81, 101.
24Wethersfield, Conn., Town Votes, vol. i, p. 69.
25Colonial Records of Connecticut, vol. i, pp. 103, 111, 114, 116, 124, 128, 130, 132, 133, 137-138, 145, 146, 149, 155, 157, 159, 160-161, 163, 166, 169, 174, 178, iSs, 188, 195, 199, 200, 201, 205, 207, 212, 212, 213-214, 216, 218, 224, 225, 230-231, 234 234-235, 235, 237, 238, 240, 245, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 250, 251, 252, 256, 261, 264, 261, 272, 273-274, 278, 279, 280-281, 288, 293, 297, 300, 306, 308, 313.
26Ibid., vol. I, pp. Ill, 112.
27
Colonial Records of Connecticut, vol. i, pp. 308, 310.
28Ibid., vol. I, p. 314.
29Ibid., vol. I, pp. 334, 347, 364-365, 378, 398, 425-
30Ibid., vol. I, pp. 353, 354.
31Ibid., vol. I, pp. 392, 397.
32Mass. Historical Society's Collections, fifth series, vol. 9, pp. 59-61.
33Colonial Records of Connecticut, vol. I, pp. 358, 361-362.
34Ibid., vol. I, pp. 358, 362, 369, 370.
35Colonial Records of Connecticut, vol. I, pp. 579-581, and vol. 2. pp. 3-1 1.
36Wethersfield, Conn., Town Votes, vol. I, p. 41.
37Wethersfield, Conn., Land Records, vol. 2, folio 18.
38Ibid., vol. I, p. 163.

39Wethersfield, Conn., Land Records, vol. 2, folio 113.
40Colonial Records of Connecticut, vol. 2, p. 520.
41Hartford, Conn., County Court Records, vol. 3, p. 97, and reverse end, pp. 72-73.

42Hartford, Conn., Probate Files, Richard Treat estate.
43The Treat Family, by John Harvey Treat, Salem, Mass., 1893, p. 9.
44Hartford, Conn., Probate Files, will of Richard Treat.
45Hartford, Conn., County Court Records, vol. 3, reverse end, pp. 72-73, will of Richard Treat, and reverse end, p. 13, will of John HoUister.
46New Haven, Conn., First Church Records, unpaged, baptism of Samuel, son of Matthew Camfield.
47Wethersfield, Conn., Land Records, vol. 2, p. 29, birth of Richard, son of Richard and Sarah Treat, and vol. 3, p. 60, receipt from Richard Treat of a legacy from the estate of "his father Thomas Colman deceased".
48Milford, Conn., First Church Records, unpaged, baptism of Samuel, son of Robert Treat, and Milford, Conn., Land Records, vols, 1 & 2, p. 118.
49Milford, Conn., Births, Marriages and Deaths, vol. I, unpaged; New Haven, Conn., County Court Records, vol. I, pp. 171, 141, 258, and New Haven, Conn., Probate Records, vol. 3, pp. 86, 296.
50Wolcott Ledgers & Genealogy, 1647-1691, unpaged, family of Henry Wolcott, Conn., Historical Society, and Wethersfield, Conn., Land Records, vol. I, p. 17, birth of Elizabeth, daughter of George and Elizabeth Wolcott.
51This date of marriage is given on page 230 of Nathaniel Goodwin's Genealogical Notes. Perhaps it was taken from some private record, but the original authority for it is now unknown.
52Boston Record Commissioners' Report, vol. 9, p. 53.

Source: Starr, Frank Farnsworth, Various Ancestral Lines of James Goodwin and Lucy (Morgan) Goodwin of Hartford, Connecticut, Vol. II (Morgan Lines), Hartford, CT: The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Press, 1915, pgs. 223-261.


Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700

TREAT, Richard (1584-1669/70) & Alice GAYLORD (1594-1670+); Pitminster, Eng, 17 Apr 1615; Watertown/Wethersfield, CT

Source: Torrey, Clarence A., New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004.



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Author: Michelle A. Boyd

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Last updated 26 June 2018